More photos from Little Wars

Chris Hahn, who recently attended Little Wars 2013 and provided a report on it (see post below), also provided these additional photos of other games going on at the convention:

Photo 14 - There is not a table big enough …. This is a picture of the Attack on Weizhao Dao Harbor. The 28mm models were built by professionals and amateurs. The time period? Sometime in the 1920s. The rules? ‘Boilers and Breechloaders.’

Photo 14 –
There is not a table big enough …. This is a picture of the Attack on Weizhao Dao Harbor. The 28mm models were built by professionals and amateurs. The time period? Sometime in the 1920s. The rules? ‘Boilers and Breechloaders.’

Photo 15 - The ever popular Aerodrome game. Air wargaming was covered in a recent issue of ‘Wargames Illustrated.’ Not only does each player have a model to control, but he/she also has a cockpit. Mustaches, goggles and scarves would have been a nice touch.

Photo 15 –
The ever popular Aerodrome game. Air wargaming was covered in a recent issue of ‘Wargames Illustrated.’ Not only does each player have a model to control, but he/she also has a cockpit. Mustaches, goggles and scarves would have been a nice touch.

Photo 16 - A very nice looking table of the 1812 War Battle of Chippewa. The figures were 28mm and the rules were ‘Carnage and Glory.’

Photo 16 –
A very nice looking table of the 1812 War Battle of Chippewa. The figures were 28mm and the rules were ‘Carnage and Glory.’

Photo 17 - This was a Saga pick-up game, where Franks did battle with Normans. I’ve seen a lot about these rules in 'Wargames Illustrated,' but have not actually tried them. (From what I’ve seen, they would not be suitable for a solo wargamer.)

Photo 17 –
This was a Saga pick-up game, where Franks did battle with Normans. I’ve seen a lot about these rules in ‘Wargames Illustrated,’ but have not actually tried them. (From what I’ve seen, they would not be suitable for a solo wargamer.)

Photo 18 - A rather cool looking Battle of Britain game. No white cliffs of Dover though!

Photo 18 –
A rather cool looking Battle of Britain game. No white cliffs of Dover though!

Photo 19 - An 'Age of Sail' battle in full swing. The blue octagons appear to be some sort of movement device.

Photo 19 –
An ‘Age of Sail’ battle in full swing. The blue octagons appear to be some sort of movement device.

Photo 20 - Six-millimeter Napoleonics engaged across a small table. Grand-tactical rules 'Orders to Eagles' were used.

Photo 20 –
Six-millimeter Napoleonics engaged across a small table. Grand-tactical rules ‘Orders to Eagles’ were used.

Photo 21 - Steven Fratt ran a three-day game during the convention. Each day of Little Wars was used to represent one day of Gettysburg. The table was large; the figures were tiny. The overall effect was impressive.

Photo 21 –
Steven Fratt ran a three-day game during the convention. Each day of Little Wars was used to represent one day of Gettysburg. The table was large; the figures were tiny. The overall effect was impressive.

Photo 22 - A small portion of Tod Kershner’s Pigs in Greece skirmish set up.

Photo 22 –
A small portion of Tod Kershner’s Pigs in Greece skirmish set up.

Photo 23 - Just one of the many tables dedicated to 'Flames of War' contests.

Photo 23 –
Just one of the many tables dedicated to ‘Flames of War’ contests.

Photo 24 - And another table reserved for 'Flames of War' action. I may be wrong, but this could be a scenario for Arnhem.

Photo 24 –
And another table reserved for ‘Flames of War’ action. I may be wrong, but this could be a scenario for Arnhem.

Photo 25 - Close-up of one of the Confederate vessels slated for use in the Defense of New Orleans Civil War game.

Photo 25 –
Close-up of one of the Confederate vessels slated for use in the
Defense of New Orleans Civil War game.

Photo 26 - This tabletop caught my eye because it did not have/use traditional figures or terrain. The troops and trees were made of paper. I regret not having questioned the judge on his approach, methodology, etc. Then again, it would have been rude to interrupt the game and participating generals.

Photo 26 –
This tabletop caught my eye because it did not have/use traditional figures or terrain. The troops and trees were made of paper. I regret not having questioned the judge on his approach, methodology, etc. Then again, it would have been rude to interrupt the game and participating generals.

Photo 27 - A convention favorite: The Alamo in 54mm. I saw Uncle Duke inspecting the set up.

Photo 27 –
A convention favorite: The Alamo in 54mm. I saw Uncle Duke inspecting the set up.

Photo 28 - Bill Hupp’s 54mm Battle Cry Gettysburg game - geared especially to “Junior Generals” (little boys with fathers in tow).

Photo 28 –
Bill Hupp’s 54mm Battle Cry Gettysburg game – geared especially to “Junior Generals” (little boys with fathers in tow).

 

 

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2 Responses to More photos from Little Wars

  1. Dale Hurtt says:

    Saga is playable by a solo gamer. As there are no hidden elements to the rules, it is solo appropriate. I have done a series of articles using Saga on my blog, Solo Battles.

  2. JAird says:

    Great photo’s Chris – 54mm always looks so impressive. The Alamo game seems to be quite a simple terrain setup, but with the larger figures takes on a completely different aspect to the same thing done in (say) 25mm. Although I’m always left thinking that I don’t have a table big enough for 54mm !

    There’s always the back garden of course….

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